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Forums Home  /  General Wine Discussions   /  Cheap Wine (Sale wine)  (6 posts)

vineyardhair
1 post

Jan 21, 2009
5 years, 10 months ago

1Cheap Wine (Sale wine)

In the past year or so wine has become a favorite drink of mine and has also become somewhat of a hobby. Although I've purchased many mid to high dollar bottles from a local specialty store I still buy a lot of wine from the grocery store. My understanding is that most new world wines, ( typically found in supermarkets), should not be aged the way that some old world wines can be. I picked up a few bottles on sale for 3 dollars marked down from around 15, why is this, are they outdated or over stocked? Do these typical American and Australian wines go bad, or should I just feel like a bum?

Captain Caveman
83 posts

Jan 22, 2009
5 years, 10 months ago

2Re: Cheap Wine (Sale wine)

Great question. Buying wine to drink near term and buying wine to cellar, are two very diffferent things, and you should have a different approach for each. Generally most of those inexpensive wines you find in most markets are not designed to age. That doesn't mean they won't improve, but becareful not to buy large quantities of any one uness you are prepared to have your valuable storage space clogged up by wines that are just ho hum.

You don't have to spend a lot of money on cellar worthy wines either, but it will require more experience and attention to detail to get the best results. Sweet wines typically age fairly well, and many are not expensive on release. For red wines to cellar look for wines with a good balance of fruit to acid and tannin. Offen these wines may be "too big" to drink young, but as time proceeds, the tannin structures will soften allowinbg the fruit to come through.


If you are looking foir wines that will increase in value with cellaring, i.e. for an investment, the list of candidates will be much shorter and the number of producers, vineyard sources and cuvees which will increase in value is really quite small-- though new bottlings regularly break through each vintage, particularly in regions focussed on creating these wines like Napa, Sonoma, Coonawarra, Burgundy, etc.

PVD5555
4 posts

Mar 07, 2009
5 years, 8 months ago

3Re: Cheap Wine (Sale wine)

From my understanding over 90% of wines are not meant to age and should be enjoyed young. Some of the great Cabernet Sauvignons of California and Bordeauxs of France are better aged because the tannins (as the previous poster indicated) become weaker. You'll finding useful tips in regards to this by looking a what wine critics say and many times by looking at the winemakers site.

PVD
cabernetnapa.com

Captain Caveman
83 posts

Mar 12, 2009
5 years, 8 months ago

4Re: Cheap Wine (Sale wine)

I agree with statement above that many wines commonly sold or purchased are not meant to age. I also would caution anyone about making broad statements about the ageability of anywine based strictly on it's region of origin or it varietal make up.

Ageable wines can be made from almost any modern vinifera grape, depending on the wine's maker's intention, experience, and proficiency. While some varietals like Cabernet and Nebbiolo are known for making long lived wines, the style that they are made in-- which is influenced or dictated by factors of growing season, crush conditions and regimen in the cellar, and other choices made during theire cycle from crush to bottle-- even varietals we typically associate with near termn drinking can be fasiponed into wines with great staying power. Grand Cru Chablis (made from Chardonnay grown in limestone soils) and Auslese Riesling from the Rhine (made from ultra ripe grapes grown on steep, cool hillsides) are two good examples of white wines that age well despite the fact that most wines from those grapes are not known for ageworthyness.

Likewise a wine made largely from Merlot or Cabernet Franc may be exceptionally long lived and even require cellaring if it is from Chateau Petrus or Cheteau Cheval-blanc, but a winemaker could easily make a short lived "blush-style" wine from either of those varietals also.

Captain Caveman
83 posts

Mar 12, 2009
5 years, 8 months ago

5Re: Cheap Wine (Sale wine)

My main point being if you are serious about buying wines for the purpose of aging them, make sure you tatse the wine to asses it's balance of components (this gets easier when you gain more experience as a taster).

If you decide you like a wine and would like to age it, make sure you purchase enough of it that you can re-taste it and evaluate it's progress at periodic intervals.

When trying to determine the ageability of deeply structured tannic reds, compare the sample after decanting once with multiple aerations --or taste it hourly alongside it's peer wines to see how it is holding up.

PVD5555
4 posts

Mar 15, 2009
5 years, 8 months ago

6Re: Cheap Wine (Sale wine)

I'm glad my previous post allowed Captain Caveman to elaborate more on this subject. The winemaker really does have the greatest influence in making long term wines. And yes is not a good idea to believe that the varietal category or origin will determine the age ability. Though certain ones will have more specimen examples in them and perhaps make a search easier. Caveman's suggestion on evaluating the progress is really an excellent one.

Thanks
PVD
cabernetnapa.com